Ekaterina V. Savitskaya

Place of work

Organization:
FSBEI of HE "Samara State University of Social Sciences and Education"
Position:
associate professor
Degree:
candidate of philological sciences
ORCID:
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4630-7521

Author's articles(3)

Sootnoshenie kommunikativnoi, modeliruiushchei i kumuliativnoi funktsii iazyka

20.02.2020

Annotation

the author discusses the correlation between functions of natural language mentioned in the title, puts forward the opinion that the communicative function is not prevailing in the functional spectre of language, defends the idea that message transmission is only the middle stage of speech activity carried out in language space, shows that the modelling function is no less important than the communicative function. On the material of the English lexical field «Marriage» the regularities in performing the function are demonstrated.
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Cognitive Substrate of Linguistic Thinking: The Semiotic Aspect

01.06.2020

Annotation

the article is devoted to a description of cognitive attitude complexes that underlie linguistic thinking and function in the form of cultural codes. Such complexes form a cognitive substrate of linguistic thinking. It has ethnocultural and ethnolinguistic specificity. Research methods: analysis, comparison, descriptive method, interlinguistic comparison of mercantilist and military cultural codes on the basis of English and Russian linguocultural materials. Research results. It is outlined that the cognitive substrate of the linguistic thinking performs the function of modelling reality, ac...
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Dependency Between Grammatical Structure of Language and Verbal Thinking Strategies

28.09.2020

Annotation

the article contains a discussion of how the grammatical structure of a language determines sentence structure and affects verbal thinking strategy. The stages of languages’ historic development (incorporative, ergative, nominative) and the relationship between sentence structure and native speakers’ thinking are characterized. The common case of the grammatical subject of a sentence does mean that Anglo-Saxons regard themselves as their own fortune’s active makers and masters. The common case equally expresses success and failure, activity and passivity, self-will and conformity. Nowadays, la...
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